The $6 Million Pedestrian Bridge Could Start Construction in a Year

When do you first remember hearing about the King/Liberty Pedestrian Bridge? 2014? 2012? Possibly 2010?

Well, the King-Liberty pedestrian/cycling bridge project, which was originally approved by city council in 2011, will span the rail corridor at the westerly portions between Douro Street and Western Battery Road, right across from 100 Western Battery Rd and next to 125 Western Battery Rd.

Subscribe to our eNewsletter!

Join our popular eNewsletter list. Receive monthly updates on all the fun stuff happening in Liberty Village, Toronto's best neighbourhood.

“It’s really going to provide a key connection for people who live and work in Liberty Village to get across to King (Street), Queen Street and the streetcar,” said Jeffrey Dea, manager of infrastructure planning with the City of Toronto.

“Right now they’re a bit landlocked.” Pedestrians and cyclists currently have to choose Strachan Ave or Atlantic Ave as their only way in or out of Liberty Village, which is inconvenient for a lot of people.

liberty-village-pedestrian-bridgeThe project is currently in the detailed design phase and won’t begin construction until the fall of 2017 so it doesn’t interfere with Metrolinx’s work on the Strachan Avenue overpass. 

So far, design elements of the bridge include a wide enough surface for pedestrians and cyclists, access to an open staircase with a bike channel, elevators, an enclosed bridge deck with sufficient lighting and security cameras for added safety.

The design process as well as the Environmental Assessment done in 2011 – with a price tag of about $1-million, according to Mike Layton, councillor for the ward (Trinity Spadina) – is funded by ‘Section 37’ funds, which allows municipalities to receive benefits from developers in exchange for allowing housing projects that exceed height and/or density restrictions. 

The construction of the bridge will cost roughly $6-million.

“If you live in the townhouses you have to walk backwards 120-metres to walk up to King(Street). This will allow people to cut over the tracks, similar to what’s done at City Place,” Layton told The Villager.

“This will finally give Liberty Village residents better access to public transit and better access to everything north of the tracks.”

Further public consultation on the design details are expected to convene for winter 2016-2017.

Story from Inside Toronto.

mm
About Michael Camber (360 Articles)
Michael Camber is the #1 selling real estate salesperson in King West and Liberty Village. Since 2003 he has been helping his clients achieve all of their real estate objectives.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*